30 August 2010

Southeast Asian meatballs make a hot or cold delight - The Boston Globe

"Southeast Asian food is alive with spicy, sour, salty, and sweet flavors. Lively noodle dishes, grilled meats, and composed salads from Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam can be both festive and satisfying. And they aren’t a lot of trouble; you don’t even turn a knob on the oven..."



 Image: Jonathan Levitt for the Boston Globe


Southeast Asian meatballs make a hot or cold delight - The Boston Globe

26 August 2010

Recipe Redux - Corncakes With Caviar, 1985 - NYTimes.com

"Most trends arise not from inspiration but from indignation. Food trucks were established by entrepreneurs who bridled at the start-up costs of restaurants. The pizza revolution was started by cooks who thought the form had been maligned by old-school standards like Lombardi’s and Grimaldi’s. And cold-brew coffee nerds just hated the milkshakes-disguised-as-coffee at Starbucks."



(Image:Tom Schierlitz for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Brian Preston-Campbell.)


Recipe Redux - Corncakes With Caviar, 1985 - NYTimes.com

22 August 2010

Sunday Routine - Ruth Reichl - For Ruth Reichl, a Day Built Around Food - NYTimes.com

Photo: Nathaniel Brooks for The New York Times


For Ruth Reichl, the saving grace in losing her decade-long job as editor in chief of Gourmet when the magazine closed last year is being able to live, write and cook virtually full time at her glassy hilltop home in Spencertown, N.Y., in Columbia County. Ms. Reichl, 62, who was the dining critic for The New York Times before joining Gourmet, is the author of four memoirs and is currently working on a cookbook and a novel. She and her husband, Michael Singer, 70, a retired news producer for CBS, have a son, Nick, 21, who attends Wesleyan University, and a 17-year-old cat, Stella, as well as an apartment on the Upper West Side. 


Sunday Routine - Ruth Reichl - For Ruth Reichl, a Day Built Around Food - NYTimes.com

WHFoods: Nutrient Density and Energy Density Have Opposite Effects on Our Bones

The idea of getting the greatest number of nutrients for the least amount of calories is well studied in nutrition, and goes by the name of "nutrient density" (this is the same concept that we call "nutrient-richness"). When we eat nutrient dense (or "nutrient-rich") foods, we are getting the most nutrients possible for the fewest number of calories. Since all of us have a limit on the number of calories we can consume each day while still avoiding weight gain and unhealthy addition of body fat, nutrient density is a great guideline for us to follow. 

WHFoods: Nutrient Density and Energy Density Have Opposite Effects on Our Bones

© 2001-2010 The George Mateljan Foundation 

21 August 2010

Hot Sauce - How to Make Your Own - NYTimes.com


"EVERY time I contemplate making my own hot sauce, the label on a bottle in my pantry comes to mind, on which a red-faced, bug-eyed, fire-breathing devil cries an ocean of tears."



Hot Sauce - How to Make Your Own - NYTimes.com

20 August 2010

Recipe: Peach and buttermilk bread pudding with golden raisins - latimes.com

Recipe: Peach and buttermilk bread pudding with golden raisins - latimes.com

WHFoods: Mediterranean Lentil Salad

WHFoods: Mediterranean Lentil Salad

Mediterranean Lentil Salad
This easy to prepare Mediterranean-style recipe makes a great side salad or a perfect vegetarian lunch or dinner addition to your Healthiest Way of Eating. It provides you with a wealth of health-promoting vitamins and minerals including 220% of the daily value (DV) for vitamin K, 135% DV for vitamin C, 107% DV for molybdenum and 79% DV for vitamin A. Enjoy!
Prep and Cook Time: Prep: 20 min; Cooking: 25 min; Chill: 1 hr
Ingredients:
  • 3/4 cup dried green lentils (you want to end up with 2 cups cooked)
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 oz canned/jar roasted bell peppers*, chopped
  • 2 TBS finely minced onion
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, pressed
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 3 TBS balsamic vinegar
  • 1 TBS fresh lemon juice
  • 2 TBS + 2 TBS extra virgin olive oil
  • salt and cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 bunch young dandelion leaves or arugula, chopped
  • * If you prefer, you can roast the bell peppers yourself

Directions:
  1. Wash lentils, remove any foreign matter, and drain.
  2. Combine lentils and 2 cups lightly salted water in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and cook at low temperature for about 20 minutes, or until lentils are cooked but still firm. Cook gently so lentils don't get mushy. When done, drain any excess water, and lightly rinse under cold water. Continue to drain excess water.
  3. Mince onion and press garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to bring out their hidden health-promoting benefits.
  4. Place lentils in a bowl and add peppers, onion, garlic, basil, walnuts, vinegar, and 2 TBS olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Marinate for at least 1 hour before serving.
  5. Toss dandelion or arugula with 2 TBS olive oil, 1 TBS lemon juice, salt and pepper. Serve on plate with lentils.
Serves 4
Healthy Cooking Tips:
If you want to roast your bell peppers yourself, preheat broiler on low and place peppers on sheet pan on rack in middle of the oven. Roast peppers under broiler until blistered on all sides. Do not coat with oil as peppers roast very well when dry. Place in a bowl and cover for about 10 minutes. This will make it easier to peel. Peel and chop.

19 August 2010

The Baker’s Apprentice: French Yogurt Cake - Diner's Journal Blog - NYTimes.com

The Baker’s Apprentice: French Yogurt Cake - Diner's Journal Blog - NYTimes.com

Techniques and tips discussed: grinding almonds for beginners; the risk of rancid oil; the sugar-and-zest trick; never manhandle the flour.

17 August 2010

WHFoods: Steamed Vegetable Medley

WHFoods: Steamed Vegetable Medley

Steamed Vegetable Medley

This recipe is a great way to enjoy a great selection of vegetables and, at the same time, add an excellent source of healthy-promoting vitamins A, K, and C to your Healthiest Way of Eating.

Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:


Directions:
  1. Chop onion and press garlic and let sit for 5-10 minutes to enhance their health-promoting benefits.
  2. Bring lightly salted water to a boil in a steamer with a tight fitting lid. Add carrots and onions. Cover, and steam for 3 minutes. Add collard greens, and steam for another 3 minutes. Then add zucchini and steam for another 3 minutes.
  3. Remove vegetables from steamer and place in bowl. Toss with dressing ingredients.

    If you want to cook chicken or fish, here's how to do so: Add sliced chicken breast (3/4" thick) or fish (1" thick) on the top of the carrots and onions. Serves 2

Healthy Cooking Tips:

It helps to toss the steamer basket up and down with the cooked vegetables to drain out excess water. This will keep the flavor from being diluted. Make sure you don't overcook the zucchini, as it also will dilute the flavor if overcooked. It will start to look a little translucent when it overcooks.