30 June 2012

Why supermarket tomatoes tend to taste bland - latimes.com



Ah, well. I already knew supermarket tomatoes did not even taste like the tomatoes I grew up with. They're red. That's as close as it gets. My grandfather's farm tomatoes are a memory like no other. Some organics approach that taste.

"For the last 70-odd years, tomato breeders have been selecting for fruits that are uniform in color. Consumers prefer those tomatoes over ones with splotches, and the uniformity makes it easier for producers to know when it's time to harvest."


So read why Americans are enamored of the color, and not the taste:

Why supermarket tomatoes tend to taste bland - latimes.com


26 June 2012

The International Flavors Of All-American Coleslaw : NPR

Image: Courtesy of Ben Fink

Cole Slaw. Boring. Nah. A really good cole slaw is refreshing and a great, yet subtle, palate pleaser.  Change your attitudes about what many think of a a boring side picnic dish. A nice article from NPR:


"What most Americans think of as coleslaw came along with the arrival of mayonnaise in the 18th century, but many international slaws don't contain mayonnaise — or even cabbage. There's a Thai slaw with green papaya, and Chinese broccoli slaw with a soy ginger dressing. Coleslaws can be a light crunchy blend of julienne or grated vegetables tossed in vinaigrette, or shredded vegetables with nonfat Greek yogurt combined with spices and herbs."

The International Flavors Of All-American Coleslaw : NPR


17 June 2012

The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance



Ahh, the Craig Claiborne cookbooks I have: favorites are The New York Times International Cookbook and The New York Times Cookbook, with all my notes penned in, and copies of his recipes from The New York Times stuffed in between pages. Stalwart references. 

And now, a book recently released on Claiborne, The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance
 
  • Thomas McNamee:



  • From Barnes and Noble:



  • "
  • In the 1950s, America was a land of overdone roast beef and canned green beans—a gastronomic wasteland. Most restaurants relied on frozen, second-rate ingredients and served bogus “Continental” cuisine. Authentic French, Italian, and Chinese foods were virtually unknown. There was no such thing as food criticism at the time, and no such thing as a restaurant critic. Cooking at home wasn’t thought of as a source of pleasure. Guests didn’t chat around the kitchen. Professional equipment and cookware were used only in restaurants. One man changed all that."

    The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat: Craig Claiborne and the American Food Renaissance

     
  • Thomas McNamee
    • ISBN-13: 9781439191507
    • Publisher: Free Press
    • Publication date: 5/8/2012
    • Pages: 352

    Available online from Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com







    10 June 2012

    Recipe: Chocolate Pizza - The Times of India

    From The Times of India, this recipe may quickly become many a person's favorite:



    Recipe: Chocolate Pizza


    Ingredients

    1 pound homemade pizza dough or purchased pizza dough (or make it as per the method below) 

    2 teaspoons melted butter 

    ¼ cup chocolate-hazelnut spread (Nutella) 

    ½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 

    2 tbps milk chocolate chips 

    2 tbps white chocolate chips 

    2 tbps chopped toasted hazelnuts 

    Method

    -Position the oven rack on the bottom of the oven and preheat it to 450 degrees F. Line a heavy large baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll out the dough to a 9-inch-diameter round. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking sheet. Using your fingers, make indentations all over the dough. 

    -Brush the dough with butter, then bake until the crust is crisp and pale golden brown, for about 20 minutes. Immediately spread the chocolate-hazelnut spread over the pizza then sprinkle all the chocolate chips over it. Bake just until the chocolate begins to melt, for about one minute. Sprinkle the hazelnuts over the pizza. Cut into wedges and serve. 

    To make the pizza dough

    Ingredients

    1/2 cup warm water 

    2 tsps active dry yeast 

    2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for kneading 

    1 tsp salt 

    3 tbps olive oil 

    Method: Mix warm water and yeast in a small bowl to blend. Let it stand for about five minutes, until the yeast dissolves. Mix the flour and salt in a food processor to blend. Blend in the oil. With the machine running, add the yeast mixture and blend just until the dough forms. Knead this dough for about one minute, until it's smooth. Transfer it to a large oiled bowl and turn the dough to coat with the oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set aside for an hour in a warm draft-free area until the dough doubles in volume. Punch the down dough and form it into ball. The dough can be used immediately or stored airtight in the refrigerator for one day. 

    Recipe: Chocolate Pizza - The Times of India

    09 June 2012

    More than kimchi: Korean food's popularity soars | GlobalPost

    Image: Nagyman


    If you have never tried kimchi, or know what it is, this article is for you.

    "Any primer on Korean cuisine has to begin with kimchi. It packs a pungent whiff that has a habit of lingering sometime after it has outlived its welcome, but once acquired, the taste for spicy pickled cabbage is rarely lost. No Korean meal is complete without it, either as an ingredient in the main dish, or as part of a medley of side dishes called banchan."

    More than kimchi: Korean food's popularity soars | GlobalPost


    05 June 2012

    Tired Of Mowing Your Lawn? Try Foodscaping It Instead : The Salt : NPR

    I hope you didn't misread "foodscaping" for landscaping. Yes, foodscaping:

    Image: Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio



    "That whole notion that I could have a raspberry bush alongside blueberry bushes, and I could make a fruit salad out of my backyard was just very novel and very new to me," she (Amy Pierce) says. "It's almost embarrassing to admit it":

    Tired Of Mowing Your Lawn? Try Foodscaping It Instead : The Salt : NPR