23 September 2012

Not just for Halloween, pumpkin is the new bacon! - Life Inc.

And now for something seasonal: Pumpkins.



You may have noticed in the last few years more and more pumpkin products on the market.

" 'Pumpkin has a healthful perception,' says Technomic Executive VP Darren Tristano. He says the ingredient has gotten so popular it's finally gone mainstream. 'It's getting to McDonald's in milkshakes, and as a result, it is likely getting to a point of final maturity. We'll look towards sustainability over time.' "

Not just for Halloween, pumpkin is the new bacon! - Life Inc.

And for those of you that absolutely need a few recipes, including a baked, stuffed pumpkin, from Delish,

"Skip the Pie: Healthy Pumpkin Recipes".


22 September 2012

"First -- You Make A Roux" (1954) II

More from "First -- You Make A Roux" (1954); two additional selected pages:





And, before you leave, please visit one of my advertisers to help support this blog. Thanks!





21 September 2012

Photographing Literature's Famous Food Scenes : The Picture Show : NPR

Many an avid reader has had to "picture" a repast, a food, a described recipe, in the passage of many works of literature. What is the author writing about? What does it look like?  How does it taste?



"A confession: I've read Jack Kerouac's On the Road, but I can't tell you much about it. Yes, I know he's on a road trip. But beyond that, I don't recall any of the characters or anything they do or what the point was. What I do remember is that he described some truly great food. In fact, I liked those sections of the book so much that when I read them, I apparently felt the need to scribble them down, word for word, in a notebook."

This article, is a teaser of sorts:

Photographing Literature's Famous Food Scenes : The Picture Show : NPR

Before you leave, please visit one of my advertisers to help support this blog, Thanks! 


WHFoods: The Latest News About Shrimp


Is shrimp a food that should be avoided for any number of reasons: environmental factors, cholesterol content, etc.? Or should you include it in your diet?



"Please note that we have placed shrimp on our "10 Most Controversial WHFoods List." This list was created to let you know that even though some foods (like shrimp) can make an outstanding contribution to your meal plan, they are definitely not for everyone. Shrimp can be difficult to find in high-quality form; can be more commonly associated with adverse reactions than other foods; and can present more challenges to our food supply in terms of sustainability..."

The whole article, really informative and detailed, can be found at:


WHFoods: The Latest News About Shrimp

And more on shrimp from Wikipedia.

Before you leave, please visit one of my advertisers to help support this blog, Thanks! 

04 September 2012

Kenyon's Grist Mill

It is not often that I feature a commercial site on this blog. But in the case of Kenyon's Grist Mill there are several  reasons: the historical nature of the mill and the business; and the hard-to-find products from Rhode Island and New England they offer.


"We are the oldest manufacturing business in Rhode Island, and the second oldest continuously operating business in the state.  Although our current building dates back to 1886, we've been grinding meals & flours continuously on site since 1696.  Our most popular items are White Corn Meal (or Johnny Cake Meal), Clam Cake Mix, Pancake Mixes, Corn Bread & Muffin Mix, Brown Bread Mix, as well as a variety of other meals, flours and other mixes."

I have tried a variety of the products offered, and have not been disappointed (especially being a native of Rhode Island). Give the site a visit:

Kenyon's Grist Mill

Before you leave, please visit one of my advertisers to help support this blog, Thanks!




02 September 2012

Our 12 Most Popular Stories This Week | Food Republic



Here is a little this and that from Food Republic:

"What better time than a lazy Labor Day weekend to play 20 Questions? Which Asian country drinks the most gin in the world? Did your mom ever leave notes in your lunchbox? Shouldorganic wine standards change? How on earth did haggis make it big among Thailand's hipsters, and most important of all: which effs up more of your brain cells, booze or TV?"

Our 12 Most Popular Stories This Week | Food Republic


Before you leave, please visit one of my advertisers to help support this blog, Thanks!



Ale to the chief: White House reveals beer recipe that has Internet abuzz - First Read



Here is one of the (currently) most searched-for recipes. Bottoms up:

Ale to the chief: White House reveals beer recipe that has Internet abuzz - First Read


WHITE HOUSE HONEY PORTER

Ingredients
  • 2 (3.3 lb) cans light unhopped malt extract
  • 3/4 lb Munich Malt (cracked)
  • 1 lb crystal 20 malt (cracked)
  • 6 oz black malt (cracked)
  • 3 oz chocolate malt (cracked)
  • 1 lb White House Honey
  • 10 HBUs bittering hops
  • 1/2 oz Hallertaur Aroma hops
  • 1 pkg Nottingham dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup corn sugar for bottling
Directions
  1. In a 6 qt pot, add grains to 2.25 qts of 168˚ water. Mix well to bring temp down to 155˚. Steep on stovetop at 155˚ for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, bring 2 gallons of water to 165˚ in a 12 qt pot. Place strainer over, then pour and spoon all the grains and liquid in. Rinse with 2 gallons of 165˚ water. Let liquid drain through. Discard the grains and bring the liquid to a boil. Set aside.
  2. Add the 2 cans of malt extract and honey into the pot. Stir well.
  3. Boil for an hour. Add half of the bittering hops at the 15 minute mark, the other half at 30 minute mark, then the aroma hops at the 60 minute mark.
  4. Set aside and let stand for 15 minutes.
  5. Place 2 gallons of chilled water into the primary fermenter and add the hot wort into it. Top with more water to total 5 gallons if necessary. Place into an ice bath to cool down to 70-80˚.
  6. Activate dry yeast in 1 cup of sterilized water at 75-90˚ for fifteen minutes. Pitch yeast into the fermenter. Fill airlock halfway with water. Ferment at room temp (64-68˚) for 3-4 days.
  7. Siphon over to a secondary glass fermenter for another 4-7 days.
  8. To bottle, make a priming syrup on the stove with 1 cup sterile water and 3/4 cup priming sugar, bring to a boil for five minutes. Pour the mixture into an empty bottling bucket. Siphon the beer from the fermenter over it. Distribute priming sugar evenly. Siphon into bottles and cap. Let sit for 1-2 weeks at 75˚.

WHITE HOUSE HONEY ALE

Ingredients
  • 2 (3.3 lb) cans light malt extract
  • 1 lb light dried malt extract
  • 12 oz crushed amber crystal malt
  • 8 oz Bisquit Malt
  • 1 lb White House Honey
  • 1 1/2 oz Kent Goldings Hop Pellets
  • 1 1/2 oz Fuggles Hop pellets
  • 2 tsp gypsum
  • 1 pkg Windsor dry ale yeast
  • 3/4 cup corn sugar for priming
Directions
  1. In an 12 qt pot, steep the grains in a hop bag in 1 1/2 gallons of sterile water at 155 degrees for half an hour. Remove the grains.
  2. Add the 2 cans of the malt extract and the dried extract and bring to a boil.
  3. For the first flavoring, add the 1 1/2 oz Kent Goldings and 2 tsp of gypsum. Boil for 45 minutes.
  4. For the second flavoring, add the 1/2 oz Fuggles hop pellets at the last minute of the boil.
  5. Add the honey and boil for 5 more minutes.
  6. Add 2 gallons chilled sterile water into the primary fermenter and add the hot wort into it. Top with more water to total 5 gallons. There is no need to strain.
  7. Pitch yeast when wort temperature is between 70-80˚. Fill airlock halfway with water.
  8. Ferment at 68-72˚ for about seven days.
  9. Rack to a secondary fermenter after five days and ferment for 14 more days.
  10. To bottle, dissolve the corn sugar into 2 pints of boiling water for 15 minutes. Pour the mixture into an empty bottling bucket. Siphon the beer from the fermenter over it. Distribute priming sugar evenly. Siphon into bottles and cap. Let sit for 2 to 3 weeks at 75˚.